Whisky & Peat

I have never been much of a whisky(uisge) drinker.  Until a month or two ago, I had no particular interest in whisky, and I would have said that all whiskies pretty much tasted the same, and not particularly good.

Then, my wife bought me a bottle of Caol Ila (“COOL-Aye-la”), which tasted distinctly different:  It tasted like no substance I could ever remember trying before.  I was not sure I liked it, but it seemed so odd I kept trying it to figure it out.

One day I tried comparing it to some other whiskey (Bushmills, I think) that I happened to have on the shelf.  Bushmills still tastes like pretty much other whiskies, in my opinion.  In the comparison, I discovered to my surprise that I liked Caol Ila.

I shared these thoughts with my wife (who normally doesn’t drink at all), and she tried a small sip:  “It’s peat.”  She has traveled extensively in Ireland and Scotland; the odd smell & taste that I couldn’t figure out was instantly recognizable to her.

When the bottle ran out (a month later?) I thought about getting another – but at ~$55/bottle this is a vice I do not want to acquire as a habit.  Still, I remained curious: were there other whiskies with this same flavor?  WhiskyForEveryone.com helpfully provided a chart with whiskies (all scotch) sorted by “peatiness”, measured as phenol parts per million (PPM).

(Aside: There is apparently one Irish whiskey that is also peated: Connemarra.)

Long-story-short: I went out to buy more peated whiskies “for science“.  The first liquor store I tried didn’t have Caol Ila (30-35 PPM) and so I tried Highland Park (20 PPM, $50/bottle).  They carried Lagavulin, (35-40 PPM) but at $70/bottle, that was a non-starter for me. Highland Park was similar to Caol Ila, but not as good.  Later I tried another store, and they also did not carry Caol Ila, and so I tried Laphroaig. (40-43 PPM, $40/bottle)

Before trying Laphroaig, I didn’t get the connection between “peaty” and “smoky”.  Laphroiag, in my opinion, is so smoky, it’s like drinking liquid campfire.  It’s got the peat kick of Caol Ila, but too much (in my current opinion).

I will experiment with blending Laphroaig with other non-smoky beverages to mellow it back to tasty, but so far, Caol Ila has a fascinating peat richness without being overpowering.  I guess maybe I’m a whisky drinker after all.

ArtJamz in Crystal City

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ArtJamz in Crystal City

Zette took the Risacher family to “ArtJamz” in Crystal City this morning.  The event was held in the 11th floor of Crystal Square 5, which is one of the buildings across the street from my old office building. There is a lot of empty office space in Crystal City since BRAC Recommendation 133 was implemented.

Since I spent a great deal of time in Crystal City office buildings, being in vacated office space repurposed as an art venue is eerie, or a least cognitively dissonant.

But the light was fabulous and I don’t usually paint, so it was a fun change of pace.

Zette's painting from ArtJamz 2014-01-12

Zette’s painting from ArtJamz 2014-01-12

 

Dan's painting from ArtJamz 2014-01-12 working title "Lilith Recaptured"

Dan’s painting from ArtJamz 2014-01-12 working title “Lilith Recaptured”

 

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Megan’s painting from ArtJamz 2014-01-12

Luke's 1st painting from ArtJamz 2014-01-12

Luke’s 1st painting from ArtJamz 2014-01-12

 

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Luke’s 2nd painting from ArtJamz 2014-01-12

Jame did a painting too, but chooses not to publish it.

Hellekson’s Law: How did I do?

This article is also posted to my Intelink blog.


I learned the other day about Hellekson’s Law, which states that more specific policy can be improved for the general case by removing delimiters that narrow the policy scope.

In particular, the thought was originally formulated with respect to government policies with respect to Open Source Software: if there is an agency policy about open source software, then it could be improved by removing the words “open source”.  Whatever policy statement applies to open source software, probably applies to software in general.

This makes sense to me… although I suspect that it doesn’t apply in all cases.  Sometimes there may be specific statements that apply uniquely to open source software, specifically because of it’s open-sourciness.  As the original author of the Department of Defense policy statement on open source software, I’m intrigued:  how did I do?

Let’s analyze the policy/guidance section of the DoD memo and see if it articulates policy that should apply to all software, not just OSS:
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Ancient History & Yak Shaving

From April 2003 until January of 2006, I wrote a blog which was incinerated in May 2011 by a house fire.   This weekend, 2 1/2 years after the fire, I found a backup of the old blog and restored the posts into my current, WordPress-based blog.

The old posts (and this post) are tagged with the category ‘ancient‘.

Below follows a description of the Yak Shaving necessary to restore those posts.  The tale is possibly interesting to someone, in that it includes a working example of using the WordPress XML-RPC API from node.js. Continue reading

…the hope that Congress will recognize a “moral obligation”…

This article is also cross-posted to my intelink blog.


Part of the Antideficiency Act (codified at 31 U.S.C. § 1342) reads as follows:

An officer or employee of the United States Government or of the District of Columbia government may not accept voluntary services for either government or employ personal services exceeding that authorized by law except for emergencies involving the safety of human life or the protection of property. . . .

I have heard this admonition at various times in the context of Open Source Software: if the government cannot accept “voluntary services”, then presumably it cannot allow people to volunteer to write open-source software for the government. Maybe it can’t even use open source software, since it was either written by volunteers or at least licensed for use voluntarily…?

These concerns are, of course, completely wrong, as I will endeavor to show:
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my reverse-proxy

UPDATE: There is a followup to this post.

Various people have asked me about my reverse proxy server, which I alluded to previously.  I’ve used Apache mod_proxy, and perlbal, but now I do it with a 50-odd SLOC node.js program, which leans heavily on node-http-proxy.  It’s too ad-hoc to be worth posting to GitHub, but its possibly worth describing for any other node.js types out there.
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